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33 results.
  • Impact on Inclusive Education thumbnail

    To Truly Be Inclusive is a Whole Life Process: Reflections of a SU Graduate | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    Soldovieri describes some of her own schooling experience, and how she came to understand that inclusion is a whole life process. (See “We Expect Them to Teach All Students” for a companion piece.)

  • Impact on Inclusive Education thumbnail

    Unfiltered Truths of Co-Teaching | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    Two teachers, one coming from a special education background and one from a general education classroom, share their realizations based on co-teaching together for two years. (See “Together We Are Better! Collaborative Teaming to Support Authentic Inclusion of Students with Complex Support Needs” for a companion piece.)

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    Vermont Educators Share Guiding Principles | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    Three educators share guiding principles that arose from their work in implementing an inclusive service delivery model. (See “Inclusive Service Delivery: A Proactive Model for Better Educating ALL Students” for more information.)

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    What Data Tell Us About General Education and Students with Disabilities | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    Presents information about the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) data for students with disabilities.  It demonstrates a significant difference in LRE for those students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. (See “The Hope of Lessons Learned:  Supporting the Inclusion of Students with the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities Into General Education Classrooms” for more information.)

  • Impact on Inclusive Education thumbnail

    Who’s Missing? The Essential Question for Catholic Schools | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    Beth Foraker, Founder and Director of The National Catholic Board on Full Inclusion, asks “who’s missing?” in Catholic schools. (See companion pieces “A Family’s Journey of Inclusion and “I Have Great Friends.”)

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    Wide Open Spaces: Maggie’s Story | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    A parent shares how she learned the safest space for her daughter, Maggie, was not in a sheltered classroom, but in a classroom surrounded by typical peers. She also details how Maggie’s friends helped the adults around her understand and better address her needs and desires.

  • Impact on Inclusive Education thumbnail

    “I Have Great Friends”: Thomas Byrne | Impact | Winter 2018/19 Volume 31, Number 2

    A companion piece to “A Family’s Journey of Inclusion;” in it, Thomas Bryne describes his experiences being a student in an inclusive setting. (See also: “Who’s Missing? The Essential Question for Catholic Schools.”)

  • DLM Core Vocabulary

    A set of 36 single words that can be used alone or in combination for a range of communication purposes. Several formats are available to support students, including high contrast and 3D versions. The Universal Core Vocabulary is also available on many communication apps and devices.

  • NCSC Brief 5: Standards-based Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for Students Who Participate in AA-AAS

    Provides information about creating a standards-based IEP for students who participate in alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards. The brief includes information about: how an IEP differs from curricula; individualization of the plan; creating systems-level support for standards-based IEPs; and guidelines for incorporating grade-level standards.

  • NCSC Communications Toolkit

    The National Center and State Collaborative (NCSC) Communications Toolkit consists of eight modules that teach participants about communicating with students. The module topics include: an introduction to communicating with students who take alternate assessments; identifying student communication; sensory and motor factors; selecting appropriate communication; targets to teach, selecting AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication systems); teaching communication, embedding communication into academic content, and monitoring communication progress.

  • NCSC Core Content Connectors

    The Core Content Connectors (CCC) identify the most important grade-level, core academic content from English Language Arts and Mathematics found in both the Common Core Standards and the Learning Progression Frameworks. CCCs are the knowledge and skills students should have.

  • NCSC Element Cards

    The Element Cards promote understanding of how students move toward the Common Core State Standards. They contain one or more Core Content Connectors (CCC) from an instructional family, include progress indicators from the Learning Progression Frameworks, and provide essential understandings. These are meant to help teachers develop inclusive lessons.

  • NCSC Instructional Lesson Units - English Language Arts (Elementary)

    At this link, educators can find five sample Elementary English & Language Arts lessons that show examples of how to develop an inclusive lesson plan for students with significant cognitive disabilities.